Climate Economics

Climate Change: It's the Variability, Stupid

Studies evaluating the impact of climate change have mostly focused on the effects of mean changes in climate. This approach may severely underestimate the vulnerability of human society to anthropogenic-driven climate change. This is because the biological and agricultural sectors are also affected by changes in climate variability and extreme events. A recent article by Thornton et al. (2014) reviews our current understanding on the topic and highlights significant gaps in the research. Expected changes due to climate…

Study Shows Health Co-Benefits Justify Costs of Greenhouse Gas Reduction

A new study by Thompson et al. (2014) suggests that greenhouse gas reductions can be economically justified based on health benefits that result from associated reductions of other pollutants such as particulate matter and ozone that frequently come from the same sources.

Although this linkage has been studied for some time, the connections between policies and health and economic benefits are highly

Large-scale Electrification: The Stress Nexus With Water. Karen Hussey

Karen Hussey is Associate Professor at the Fenner School of Environment and Society at the Australian National University (ANU) where she undertakes research on policies, institutions and governance for sustainable development. She leads several projects assessing the effectiveness of Australian laws and policies for supporting adaptation to climate change.

Intergenerational Differences in Carbon Emissions

Changing people’s carbon emission patterns requires first understanding the differences in behaviors and corresponding emissions levels between different groups of people. A recent paper by Chancel in the journal Ecological Economics investigated the differences in carbon emissions between different generations in the U.S. and France. The author examined carbon emissions by American and French

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