Environment

Ecology and Evolution of Invasive Mosquito Disease Vectors

This presentation will describe interspecific interactions and trait evolution associated with encounters in nature between Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus, the most important vectors of dengue and chikungunya viruses. Effects of larval competition on dengue transmission in nature will also be discussed.

Mosquito biology, especially ecology and behavior, is the focus of Phil Lounibos’s laboratory located in Vero Beach, Florida.

Failures of Nuclear Safety and Regulatory Reform in Japan -- The Case of Fukushima. Professor Hideaki Shiroyama, Vice Dean, Graduate School of Public Policy, The University of Tokyo

Professor Hideaki Shiroyama, Graduate School of Public Policy at The University of Tokyo (Todai), will be visiting Yale on Friday, February 28, 2014, and will give a Special Lecture in the YCEI series on Interdisciplinary Topics in Energy. The lecture will discuss failures of regulatory policy and nuclear safety in Japan, along with proposals for reform, in light of the accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant, which was caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake and the resulting tsunami on March 11, 2011.

Evolution in the Anthropocene: Population Genomics of NYC Wildlife

Over 50% of humans now lives in cities, and urbanization is one of the most important drivers of land transformation around the world.  Increasingly, human-drive changes such as urbanization or global climate change are also selective forces driving rapid evolutionary change in other species.  This presentation describes ongoing efforts to develop white-footed mice (and a few other species) in New York City as models for examining the evolutionary implications of urbanization.

When Fracking Comes to Town: Pace University's 14th Annual Land Use Conference (Panel Discussion)

Resiliency is the theme of Pace University’s upcoming 15th annual land use conference.   Defined as “ how systems and settlements stand up to shock from the outside…”1, resiliency is an appropriate organizational concept for a panel discussion on how communities might respond to the potentially shocking discovery of rich stores of gas shale beneath their land.

When Evolved Behaviors Backfire

Frogs that eat holiday lights, birds that eat plastic, and beetles attempting to mate with beer bottles are all examples of organisms that have fallen victim to what biologists call “evolutionary traps.”  Whereas natural selection typically produces organisms that behave in ways to maximize their fitness, resulting in more offspring passing their genes onto the next generation, human actions sometimes short-circuit the process…

The Importance of Model Resolution in Global Change Biology

Biologists increasingly realize that understanding the impact of global change on biological processes requires accounting for fine-grain environmental variability (Potter, Arthur Woods, & Pincebourde, 2013). Similarly, climatologists have found that increasing the resolution of climate models typically produces better simulations of climate and precipitation…

Global Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Inland Waters

Carbon dioxide transfer from inland waters to the atmosphere is a significant component of the global carbon cycle. Global estimates of CO2 transfer have been hampered, however, by a lack of a framework for estimating the inland water surface area and gas transfer velocity and the absence of a global CO2 database. Here we report regional variations in global inland water surface area, dissolved CO2 and gas transfer velocity.

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