Communicating on Climate Change

Shell Oil's New Lens Scenarios. Niel Golightly

YCEI Director Mark Pagani introduces the conference keynote speaker, Niel Golightly, VP External Affairs for Shell Americas.  Golightly discusses his company’s “New Lens” Scenarios, the latest version of a semi-annual analysis of the energy business environment that they have produced as a planning tool for the past 40 years.  “Mountains” and “Oceans” represent two alternative possibilities of what the world could look like in the year 2050 based on different structural approaches to decision-making in the context of resource management.  The latest scenarios present very different pi

"Going Local," Making Climate Assessments More Relevant for New England Decision-makers. Cameron Wake

Presenting data as regionally focused (eg., “Southern New Hampshire”, vs.”New England”), and temperatures in fahrenheit vs. centigrade, are examples that Dr. Cameron Wake cites as ways to more effectively engage audiences that are not steeped in science, but who need its findings to make decisions to prepare for a New England destined to experience more and more extreme weather events.

Semantics "Very Likely" a Problem in IPCC Communications

The United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the leading international organization for assembling and disseminating information about climate change, apparently has a language problem.  Authors of a recent study found that lay people around the world frequently misinterpret IPCC terminology that describes the probability of future climate change.  The IPCC uses probability statements with associated…

Semantics "Very Likely" a Problem in IPCC Communications

The United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the leading international organization for assembling and disseminating information about climate change, apparently has a language problem.  Authors of a recent study found that lay people around the world frequently misinterpret IPCC terminology that describes the probability of future climate change.

The IPCC uses probability statements with associated likelihood values ranging from 1% to 99% to describe the strength of their data and conclusions.  Relying on terms like “exceptionally unlikely,” “about as like…

For Ecologists, Is Climate Change Research Sufficiently Complex?

Climate change will alter myriad natural processes as precipitation patterns shift and oceanic and atmospheric temperatures and CO2 concentrations rise. Modern ecology and environmental science has already examined the potential effects of climate change on species and ecosystems, allowing us to elucidate the mechanisms and pathways through which it may operate (Tylianakis et al. 2008)…

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