Climate & the Social Sciences

Can't Stand the Smoke

Acute respiratory infections – the result of smoky cooking fires in poorly ventilated homes – kill an estimated 4 million people each year1, most of them women and children in developing nations.  Household air pollution (HAP) and the unimproved cook stoves that cause it…

A Public Political Ecology of the Carbon Economy. Tracey Osborne

Tracey Osborne is Assistant Professor in the School of Geography and Development and Director of the Public Political Ecology Lab at the University of Arizona. Her research investigates the political ecology of environmental markets, particularly carbon markets, and their implications for the lives and livelihoods of forest communities in the Global South. Specifically, she explores the intersection of carbon markets, development, and agrarian change as they relate to forestry-based carbon initiatives in Mexico.

Climate and the Collapse of the Maya

The study of climate change, and realization that the Holocene, previously considered a period of great climatic stability experienced significant and dramatic disturbances, has occasioned new interdisciplinary study of the Maya, one of North and Central America’s great pre-Colombian civilizations. Scientists, anthropologists, archeologists, and historians have reinvigorated efforts to explain their sudden collapse, which took place from approximately 800-1000 CE in a period known as the Terminal Classic.

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