Climate Science

Excessive Winter Deaths. Don't Expect Reductions From Global Warming

A presumed benefit of global warming is the assumption that warmer winter temperatures might decrease excessive winter deaths (EWDs) common in temperate climates. EWDs are defined as the difference between the number of deaths in a region during winter months (December – March) and the average of the proceeding fall and subsequent spring deaths. EWDs are attributable to a number of factors including higher incidences of cardio-respiratory and infectious diseases along with colder temperatures and icy conditions that can cause hypothermia and accidental falls.

After a Hard Winter, Scientists Explain "Where Has All the Warming Gone?"

After much of the U.S. experienced an unusually long and cold winter, many ask whether climate change is still happening.  There has, in fact, been little change in global mean annual temperature since the early 2000s leaving scientists struggling to figure out where the heat associated with continuing greenhouse gas emissions has gone.  In a recent paper…

Benefits Outweigh Costs of Massive Renewable Energy Deployment

The power grid is a massively complicated network of generators, power converters, and transmission lines controlled through the cooperation of numerous private corporations and local and international agencies. Grid operators rely on long and short-term “to-the-minute” weather predictions and other inputs to predict demand and prevent disruption. Government policies and economic constraints of the coming decades require the grid in the United States (and elsewhere) to become even more intelligent, interconnected, and efficient.

Water-related Disease and Climate

Human-induced climate change is altering precipitation patterns in most parts of the world (Stocker et al., 2013). In the future, climate change will likely exacerbate droughts (Trenberth et al., 2014; Dai, 2012) and drastically increase the likelihood of floods throughout many parts of South America, Africa and southern Asia (Hirabayashi  et al., 2013) …

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