In the News

In The News articles are short summaries written by our postdoctoral fellows of recently published work or news events that are relevant to Postdoctoral, graduate, or faculty research

Contributor(s): Christopher MacMinn
A key challenge in large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration is that injecting large amounts of CO2 pressurizes the subsurface. This pressurization is one fundamental limit on reservoir capacity because of the risk of reservoir damage and leakage. A new study by Kyung Won Chang and colleagues...
Contributor(s): Mark Pagani
The Yale Climate and Energy Institute will host a panel discussion on how global warming will affect New England in the 21st century and how the region is preparing for the coming changes. The meeting will take place at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, in Burke Auditorium of...
Contributor(s): Maria Andrea Pinones
The increase in anthropogenic atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) alters the atmosphere-ocean equilibrium, changes seawater carbonate chemistry and lowers ocean pH. Ocean acidification is a predictable consequence of rising atmospheric CO2, and lower seawater pH and calcium carbonate (CaCO3)...
Contributor(s): Xavier Levine
Global warming simulations suggest that wet regions (where precipitation exceeds evaporation) will become wetter and dry regions drier by the end of the 21st century (e.g., Held and Soden 2006), with larger contrasts expected between dry and wet seasons (Chou et al., 2013). This ‘rich-get-richer’...
Contributor(s): Xavier Levine
Earth’s climate is characterized by persistent westerly jets (eastward flow) in the upper troposphere, located in the mid-latitudes of the Northern and Southern Hemisphere, which are associated locally with strong weather systems. The location of these jets is of paramount importance to human...
Contributor(s): Maria Andrea Pinones
Subpolar ocean gyres (large systems of rotating ocean currents) in the Southern Hemisphere are found poleward of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current near the Weddell and Ross Sea. They play a key role in the global energy and water budgets. These gyres are crucial for the transport of heat around the...
Contributor(s): Mark Pagani
(CNN) Most of us can appreciate that the world is an ancient place and that a lot has changed in the almost 4.6 billion years since it took its shape. It’s not easy to have a feel for the amount of time that has passed, but grappling with deep time helps you understand why an atmospheric ...

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