In the News

Contributor(s): Adam Rosenblatt
Changing people’s carbon emission patterns requires first understanding the differences in behaviors and corresponding emissions levels between different groups of people. A recent paper by Chancel in the journal Ecological Economics investigated the differences in carbon emissions between...
Contributor(s): Jonathan Mellor
Transportation sector greenhouse gas reductions do more than save energy: greener public transportation alternatives can reduce traffic congestion, lessen US dependence on foreign oil and make the US more economically competitive. In addition to these benefits, policies that reduce GHG emissions by...
Contributor(s): Jordan Lang
In 1961, the Nobel Prize-winning co-inventor of the transistor, William Shockley, and his colleague, Hans Quisser, identified the theoretical maximum conversion efficiency of a solar cell. They called this the “detailed balance limit,” because maximum efficiency would occur when photons absorbed...
Contributor(s): Maria Andrea Pinones
The Ross Sea, Antarctica’s most pristine region, is experiencing anomalously marked increase in sea ice concentration. Future changes in atmospheric temperatures and wind speeds, however, will likely produce a noticeably different environment. Smith et al. examines the effect of projected changes...
Contributor(s): Thomas Crowther
The growth rate of tropical trees relates to their capacity for carbon capture. South American forests are likely to capture carbon and produce wood half as fast again as their counterparts in Asia, but the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain unclear. Banin et al. compared the rates of...
Contributor(s): Adam Rosenblatt
Psychologists have known for years that people’s assessments of the risks of climate change are strongly influenced by intense local weather and short-term temperature variability. A new study by Zaval and colleagues identifies the psychological processes that underlie such skewed assessments which...
Contributor(s): Francis Ludlow
A new study by Neil Pederson and four co-authors presents a 1,112-year tree-ring-based self-calibrating Palmer Drought Severity Index (scPDSI) reconstruction for the Central Mongolian warm-season, using 107 living and dead Siberian pines growing on the Khorga lava flow. The reconstruction...

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