In the News

Contributor(s): Adam Rosenblatt
The United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the leading international organization for assembling and disseminating information about climate change, apparently has a language problem.  Authors of a recent study found that lay people around the world frequently misinterpret...
Contributor(s): Srinath Krishnan
Over the past two decades Lyme disease has emerged as the most common vector-borne disease in the United States. It is currently endemic in ~12 states, from Virginia in the South to Maine in the North, and Minnesota and Wisconsin in the West. The majority of cases are believed to be transmitted by...
Contributor(s): Xavier Levine
Recent precipitation declines over the poleward and western margins of subtropical dry zones from North America to Australia are consistent with a reorganization of atmospheric dynamics attributable to global warming. But are these droughts attributable to anthropogenic forcings like increased GHG...
Contributor(s): Adam Wilson
Figure 1: The schematic shows change in the drivers of ecosystem responses (blue) that are probable to arise from the use of sulphate aerosols, compared with not using sulphate aerosols, given current trends of increasing greenhouse gas concentrations, and the probable ecosystem responses (green...
Contributor(s): Adam Rosenblatt
As the climate warms, all species will either need to find new habitats with similar temperatures to those they currently occupy or evolve new thermal tolerances. Recent research by Araujo and colleagues suggests that some species may be able to adapt to new, higher temperatures better than others...
Contributor(s): Jonathan Mellor
Worldwide, about 800 million people lack access to an improved water source. In its most basic form, an improved water supply is a well or protected spring that protects water from outside contamination. Lack of access to clean water helps explain why15% of all deaths of children under 5 worldwide...
Contributor(s): Francis Ludlow
A new study by Alexander Stine and Peter Huybers offers strong evidence that reduced light availability (“global dimming”) explains the apparent lack of tree-ring evidence in many Arctic regions for the recent warming observed in instrumental records there. Dendroclimatology uses measurements of...

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