In the News

Contributor(s): Kevin Lane
Health studies on the impact of heat waves have focused for the most part on using temperature differences and metrics such as humidity index to assign heat stress, but may not be fully accounting for the physiological response to heat. Algorithms that more accurately characterize exposure by...
Contributor(s): Adam Rosenblatt
As climate change continues and temperatures rise, people around the world will have to adapt to new climate realities. Globally, household incomes are expected to continue rising over the coming decades, so as average temperatures increase most people will likely respond by increasing their use of...
Contributor(s): Kevin Lane
Study Finds Previously Unaccounted Specific Risks for Hospital Admission During Heat-Waves. Epidemiological evidence of non-communicable health impacts from extreme heat and heat-waves has been gaining as more epidemiological evidence continues to find positive associations with cardiovascular and...
Contributor(s): Adam Rosenblatt
A major effect of climate change is acidification of the world’s oceans. As carbon dioxide is pumped into the atmosphere by the burning of fossil fuels, some of it is absorbed by the oceans and forms carbonic acid. This process slowly lowers the oceanic pH, threatening hard-bodied marine life forms...
Contributor(s): Francis Ludlow
Michael McCormick and colleagues examine the climatic backdrop to the rise and fall of the Roman Empire, adding an essential environmental context to one of the most-debated topics in history. Their paper also represents an important advance in the Journal of Interdisciplinary History’s promotion...
Contributor(s): Marta Jarzyna
Changes in vegetation biomass can significantly alter the Earth’s carbon budget and are thus an important factor in regulating the consequences of anthropogenic climate change.  Global estimates of above ground vegetation biomass, however, have been few in number.  Recent advances in remote sensing...
Contributor(s): Adam Rosenblatt
Atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide would be much higher today if not for the world’s forests, which generally act as “carbon sinks,” absorbing and storing large amounts of carbon dioxide emissions which have been rising steadily since the start of the industrial revolution.  A persistent...

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