In the News

Contributor(s): Marta Jarzyna
Studies have shown that variation in species responses to changing climate will result in disruption of biotic interactions such as predation, parasitism, competition, and mutualism, ultimately leading to changes in community composition and ecosystem functioning (e.g., Both et al. 2009). Just as...
Contributor(s): Jonathan Mellor
Along with their obvious benefits, agriculture and food production have significant environment impacts: Carbon dioxide emissions result from the power requirements of farm machinery and from the transport, storage and cooking of food. Nitrous oxide (a potent greenhouse gas) is released from soils...
Contributor(s): Francis Ludlow
Volcanic eruptions are generally considered one of the best-understood (and most dramatic) causes of sudden climate changes, with large explosive eruptions capable of causing severe short-term cooling on hemispheric and global scales. This mainly occurs when eruptions inject large volumes of sulfur...
Contributor(s): Adam Rosenblatt
One of the most feared consequences of climate warming is the potential expansion of tropical infectious diseases. However, for diseases that require intermediate hosts a warmer climate and the particular dynamics of the disease can actually reduce transmission in some cases. A recent study by...
Contributor(s): Jonathan Mellor
A new study by Thompson et al. (2014) suggests that greenhouse gas reductions can be economically justified based on health benefits that result from associated reductions of other pollutants such as particulate matter and ozone that frequently come from the same sources. Although this linkage has...
Contributor(s): Adam Rosenblatt
Global surface temperatures, which rose steadily during the end of the 20th century, have by some measures ceased to climb during the early 21st century. Since carbon dioxide emissions have certainly not decreased during this period, climate science detractors have held this as evidence that global...
Contributor(s): Jonathan Mellor
Rainwater harvesting (RWH) is an ancient technique to store water for domestic or agricultural use. It can be an important technology for regions where rainfall variability threatens water and food supplies and economic security. As such, it has the potential to be an important adaptation...

Pages