Landscape Changes

Land-based Strategies to Reduce Future Heat Island-related Mortality

Urban centers have been warming at double the global rate the last half-century. High daily temperatures are associated with increased mortality. Sustained increases in temperatures projected under most climate models represent a significant public health problem that may increase weather-related mortality in the United States. In a first of its kind study, Stone et al., (2014) modeled how local climate action plans that integrate land-based mitigation strategies through albedo and vegetation enhancement can mitigate future increases in heat-related mortality…

Joint YCEI/YIBS Climate & History Series: Depopulation, Bill Ruddiman, UVA

Scientists who study the history of climate, and those who study the history of man see increasing utility in each other’s work.  Only in the post-Ice Age Holocene is there a human record to complement other proxies that atmospheric scientists use to understand climate; advances in climate science offer insight on events of concern to historians and anthropologists.

Habitat Corridors: Saving Species. Storing Carbon

One way species adapt to changing climatic conditions is by moving their geographic ranges in the direction of changing climatic niches, usually to either higher latitude or elevations. Successful range shifts, however, are contingent upon the ability of a species to migrate to the new, climatically suitable locations. For example, species might be unable to migrate due to their intrinsic characteristics (e.g., sedentary life style or short dispersal distances) or because of lack of suitable habitats between its current…

Predicting the Cascading Effects of Climate Change on Ecosystems: "Staggeringly Complex"

Predicting the effects of climate change on the structure and function of ecosystems is difficult because most ecosystems are staggeringly complex, with many directly and indirectly interacting animal and plant species. A recent study by Christenson and colleagues attempts to track the effects of climate change through a forest ecosystem in the northeastern US to understand how one climatic alteration might affect the plant community through multiple pathways…

Global Environmental Justice: A Public Political Ecology of the Carbon Economy

Tracey Osborne is Assistant Professor in the School of Geography and Development and Director of the Public Political Ecology Lab at the University of Arizona. Her research investigates the political ecology of environmental markets, particularly carbon markets, and their implications for the lives and livelihoods of forest communities in the Global South. Specifically, she explores the intersection of carbon markets, development, and agrarian change as they relate to forestry-based carbon initiatives in Mexico.

New York City's Special Initiative for Rebuilding and Resilience: Strengths and Limitations of Climate Model-Based Approaches

Radley Horton from Columbia University Earth Institute will speak on climate projections for New York City.  The $20 billion Special Initiative for Rebuilding and Resiliency (SIRR) Plan for New York is grounded upon climate risk information provided by the New York City Panel on Climate Change (NPCC). This expert panel, tasked with advising the City on climate-related issues, completed a ‘rapid response’ climate assessment with updated climate projections.

Northeast Region Climate Change Assessment for the Next 100 years: Impacts, Mitigation, and Adaptation

Srinath’s post-doctoral research is focused on producing stakeholder-specific high-resolution climate projections for the New England region. He received his B.E. degree in Computer Science from University of Madras, India in 2004 and M.S. in Atmospheric Chemistry from North Carolina State University in 2007. During his Ph.D. at Yale University (graduated 2014), he worked on reconstructing changes in the global hydrological cycle during geological global warming events, using a combination of sedimentary biomarker records and paleoclimate models. 
 
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