Land Use

Depopulation and Greenhouse Gas Drops, Professor Bill Ruddiman, UVA

The Thursday talk – first of two in Professor Bill Ruddiman’s visit to Yale – is called “Depopulation and greenhouse-gas drops”. It summarizes evidence for drops in CO2 and CH4 concentrations during historical time prior to the industrial era. Then it reviews two possible causes: natural climate changes, and depopulation events that reduced anthropogenic gas emissions. For the largest CO2 decrease (between 1525-1610), natural causes were not the major factor. The main cause was the huge depopulation of the Americas because of disease brought in by Europeans.

When Fracking Comes to Town: Pace University's 14th Annual Land Use Conference (Panel Discussion)

Resiliency is the theme of Pace University’s upcoming 15th annual land use conference.   Defined as “ how systems and settlements stand up to shock from the outside…”1, resiliency is an appropriate organizational concept for a panel discussion on how communities might respond to the potentially shocking discovery of rich stores of gas shale beneath their land.

The Importance of Model Resolution in Global Change Biology

Biologists increasingly realize that understanding the impact of global change on biological processes requires accounting for fine-grain environmental variability (Potter, Arthur Woods, & Pincebourde, 2013). Similarly, climatologists have found that increasing the resolution of climate models typically produces better simulations of climate and precipitation…

Local Impacts of Hydro-Fracking. Pace University 13th Annual Land Use and Sustainable Development Conference

Since 1993, Pace University’s Land Use Law Center has fostered development of sustainable communities by promoting innovative land use strategies and techniques for dispute resolution.  This year’s 13th annual Land Use and Sustainable Development Conference includes discussions involving local control of what many experts see as the inevitable development of New York State’s gas shale resources.

New York City's Special Initiative for Rebuilding and Resilience: Strengths and Limitations of Climate Model-Based Approaches

Radley Horton from Columbia University Earth Institute will speak on climate projections for New York City.  The $20 billion Special Initiative for Rebuilding and Resiliency (SIRR) Plan for New York is grounded upon climate risk information provided by the New York City Panel on Climate Change (NPCC). This expert panel, tasked with advising the City on climate-related issues, completed a ‘rapid response’ climate assessment with updated climate projections.

Climate-Ecosystem Carbon Feedbacks

Respiration by plants and microorganisms is primarily responsible for mediating carbon exchanges between the biosphere and atmosphere. Climate warming has the potential to influence the activity of these organisms, altering the exchanges between carbon pools. Traditionally, the respiratory release of CO2 into the atmosphere is thought to be more temperature-sensitive than photosynthesis (carbon fixation), generating a positive climate-ecosystem carbon feedback with the potential to accelerate climate warming by up to 1.4 times.

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