Land Use

When Fracking Comes to Town: Pace University's 14th Annual Land Use Conference (Panel Discussion)

Resiliency is the theme of Pace University’s upcoming 15th annual land use conference.   Defined as “ how systems and settlements stand up to shock from the outside…”1, resiliency is an appropriate organizational concept for a panel discussion on how communities might respond to the potentially shocking discovery of rich stores of gas shale beneath their land.

The Importance of Model Resolution in Global Change Biology

Biologists increasingly realize that understanding the impact of global change on biological processes requires accounting for fine-grain environmental variability (Potter, Arthur Woods, & Pincebourde, 2013). Similarly, climatologists have found that increasing the resolution of climate models typically produces better simulations of climate and precipitation…

Local Impacts of Hydro-Fracking. Pace University 13th Annual Land Use and Sustainable Development Conference

Since 1993, Pace University’s Land Use Law Center has fostered development of sustainable communities by promoting innovative land use strategies and techniques for dispute resolution.  This year’s 13th annual Land Use and Sustainable Development Conference includes discussions involving local control of what many experts see as the inevitable development of New York State’s gas shale resources.

New York City's Special Initiative for Rebuilding and Resilience: Strengths and Limitations of Climate Model-Based Approaches

Radley Horton from Columbia University Earth Institute will speak on climate projections for New York City.  The $20 billion Special Initiative for Rebuilding and Resiliency (SIRR) Plan for New York is grounded upon climate risk information provided by the New York City Panel on Climate Change (NPCC). This expert panel, tasked with advising the City on climate-related issues, completed a ‘rapid response’ climate assessment with updated climate projections.

The Future of New England's Climate, with Senator Murphy

Senator Murphy’s address, with presentations from speakers and questions and answers from the audience.

How will global warming affect New England in the 21st century and how is the region preparing for the coming changes? On September 13th Yale Climate & Energy Institute hosted a town hall meeting on these questions, featuring short talks by climate and infrastructure experts and a panel discussion with Senator Chris Murphy (D, CT).

Regional Climate Change Assessment for the Next 100 years: Impacts, Mitigation, and Adaptation

The American Security Project (2011) report estimates that failure to address climate change could result in a $22 billion hit in GDP and nearly 100,000 jobs lost in New England between 2010 and 2050. Some of the projected impacts of climate change, such as warmer temperatures, faster than global-average sea level rise, and erratic changes in precipitation and extreme events (such as hurricanes and snowfall events), are already being felt in New England.

Challenges of monitoring carbon dioxide in the subsurface

Large-scale carbon sequestration involves capturing carbon dioxide emitted from power plants and injecting it into underground reservoirs for long-term storage. Leakage from these storage reservoirs could lead to groundwater contamination, requiring that the spread of CO2 be monitored during and after injection. Seismic surveys are one key monitoring tool, but inferring the distribution CO2 deep in the subsurface from seismic reflection data can be very challenging.

Subscribe to RSS - Land Use