Global Warming

The Hockey Stick and the Climate Wars: Dispatches From The Front Lines

A central figure in the controversy over human-caused climate change has been “The Hockey Stick,” a simple, easy-to-understand graph my colleagues and I constructed to depict changes in Earth’s temperature back to 1000 AD. The graph was featured in the high-profile “Summary for Policy Makers” of the 2001 report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), and it quickly became an icon in the debate over human-caused (“anthropogenic”) climate change.

A Town Hall Meeting at Yale with Senator Chris Murphy (September 13th, 2pm)

The Yale Climate and Energy Institute will host a panel discussion on how global warming will affect New England in the 21st century and how the region is preparing for the coming changes. The meeting will take place at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, in Burke Auditorium of Kroon Hall, on 195 Prospect Street in New Haven and include short talks by climate and infrastructure experts and a panel discussion with Senator Chris Murphy.

Join us for a discussion of these topics with panelists:

 – Senator Chris Murphy (D, CT)

What Happens in the Arctic Doesn't Stay in the Arctic (and why you should care).

Fran Ulmer is chair of the U.S. Arctic Research Commission, appointed by President Obama in March 2011. In June 2010, President Obama appointed her to the National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling. From 2007 to 2011, Ms. Ulmer was Chancellor of the University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA). Before that, she was a Distinguished Visiting Professor of Public Policy and Director of the Institute of Social and Economic Research at UAA. Ms.

New York City's Special Initiative for Rebuilding and Resilience: Strengths and Limitations of Climate Model-Based Approaches

Radley Horton from Columbia University Earth Institute will speak on climate projections for New York City.  The $20 billion Special Initiative for Rebuilding and Resiliency (SIRR) Plan for New York is grounded upon climate risk information provided by the New York City Panel on Climate Change (NPCC). This expert panel, tasked with advising the City on climate-related issues, completed a ‘rapid response’ climate assessment with updated climate projections.

Advances in Global Climate and Atmospheric Modeling: Perspectives from Yale and Todai

Researchers from Tokyo’s Todai University and Yale climate scientists made up a 5-person forum that included talks on a variety of climate science topics Friday, September 21, at Kroon Hall.  Featured talks included:

Asia: Observations and modeling - Yutaka Kondo (University of Tokyo)

Aerosol effects on ice clouds: Climate forcing and potential for geoengineering

Trude Storelvmo (Yale University)

Robust direct effect of carbon dioxide on tropical circulation and regional precipitation

Global warming simulations suggest that wet regions (where precipitation exceeds evaporation) will become wetter and dry regions drier by the end of the 21st century (e.g., Held and Soden 2006), with larger contrasts expected between dry and wet seasons (Chou et al., 2013). This ‘rich-get-richer’ behavior is consistent with a large increase in the moisture content of atmosphere, leading to enhanced horizontal moisture fluxes across regions.

When Crocodiles Roamed the Poles

(CNN) Most of us can appreciate that the world is an ancient place and that a lot has changed in the almost 4.6 billion years since it took its shape.

It’s not easy to have a feel for the amount of time that has passed, but grappling with deep time helps you understand why an atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration (CO2) of 400 parts per million (ppm) is meaningful.

Deep time is geologic time and the scale needed to fathom the evolution of life, mountains, oceans, and Earth’s climate.

Northeast Region Climate Change Assessment for the Next 100 years: Impacts, Mitigation, and Adaptation

Srinath’s post-doctoral research is focused on producing stakeholder-specific high-resolution climate projections for the New England region. He received his B.E. degree in Computer Science from University of Madras, India in 2004 and M.S. in Atmospheric Chemistry from North Carolina State University in 2007. During his Ph.D. at Yale University (graduated 2014), he worked on reconstructing changes in the global hydrological cycle during geological global warming events, using a combination of sedimentary biomarker records and paleoclimate models. 
 

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