Climate

Up in the Sky: Next week's forum on global climate & atmospheric modeling

New insight into the origin of monsoons, the potential use of aerosols to cool the globe, and how different industries uniquely impact atmospheric warming are the contributions of YCEI researchers at an upcoming forum on Global Climate and Atmospheric Modeling, Saturday, September 21, at KGL.  Researchers from Tokyo’s Todai University round out the 5-person forum with talks on the radiative forcing of aerosols in East Asia and a model of 100,000-year glacial-interglacial cycles.  The forum starts at 1 p.m.

Cascading Complexity: Models, Tsetse, Climate Change and Agriculture

Joseph Messina is Professor of Geography and Acting Director of the Center for Global Change and Earth Observations at Michigan State University. He holds a Ph.D. in Geography from UNC- Chapel Hill (2001). He has worked in the Amazon, SE Asia, and East Africa on human – environment interactions, infectious diseases, and land change science. In Michigan, he explores issues related to health care access and recently co-authored a new standard for hospital services. 

 

A Town Hall Meeting at Yale with Senator Chris Murphy (September 13th, 2pm)

The Yale Climate and Energy Institute will host a panel discussion on how global warming will affect New England in the 21st century and how the region is preparing for the coming changes. The meeting will take place at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, in Burke Auditorium of Kroon Hall, on 195 Prospect Street in New Haven and include short talks by climate and infrastructure experts and a panel discussion with Senator Chris Murphy.

Join us for a discussion of these topics with panelists:

 – Senator Chris Murphy (D, CT)

New York City's Special Initiative for Rebuilding and Resilience: Strengths and Limitations of Climate Model-Based Approaches

Radley Horton from Columbia University Earth Institute will speak on climate projections for New York City.  The $20 billion Special Initiative for Rebuilding and Resiliency (SIRR) Plan for New York is grounded upon climate risk information provided by the New York City Panel on Climate Change (NPCC). This expert panel, tasked with advising the City on climate-related issues, completed a ‘rapid response’ climate assessment with updated climate projections.

Going Local: Making Climate Assessments More Relevant for Decision Makers In New England

Cameron Wake is a research associate professor in climatology at the Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans and Space at the University of New Hampshire.  He also has a joint appointment in the UNH Department of Earth Sciences and is the Josephine A. Lamprey Fellow in Climate and Sustainability at the UNH Sustainability Institute.

Advances in Global Climate and Atmospheric Modeling: Perspectives from Yale and Todai

Researchers from Tokyo’s Todai University and Yale climate scientists made up a 5-person forum that included talks on a variety of climate science topics Friday, September 21, at Kroon Hall.  Featured talks included:

Asia: Observations and modeling - Yutaka Kondo (University of Tokyo)

Aerosol effects on ice clouds: Climate forcing and potential for geoengineering

Trude Storelvmo (Yale University)

Robust direct effect of carbon dioxide on tropical circulation and regional precipitation

Global warming simulations suggest that wet regions (where precipitation exceeds evaporation) will become wetter and dry regions drier by the end of the 21st century (e.g., Held and Soden 2006), with larger contrasts expected between dry and wet seasons (Chou et al., 2013). This ‘rich-get-richer’ behavior is consistent with a large increase in the moisture content of atmosphere, leading to enhanced horizontal moisture fluxes across regions.

When Crocodiles Roamed the Poles

(CNN) Most of us can appreciate that the world is an ancient place and that a lot has changed in the almost 4.6 billion years since it took its shape.

It’s not easy to have a feel for the amount of time that has passed, but grappling with deep time helps you understand why an atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration (CO2) of 400 parts per million (ppm) is meaningful.

Deep time is geologic time and the scale needed to fathom the evolution of life, mountains, oceans, and Earth’s climate.

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