From Process to Proxy – The Science Behind Understanding Ancient Climate Change

The ability to predict future climate relies heavily on our understanding of past climates. We can view these ancient climates as natural experiments that provide a range of examples for the behavior of the Earth’s climate system, enabling us to understand how the climate system responds to forcings. A wide variety of methods have been developed to study these natural experiments.

The future of summer Arctic sea ice

When will the summer Arctic be nearly sea ice free? The answer is “eventually” given anthropogenic warming, but different considerations of the available data yield different answers.  Overland and Wang address this question and attempt to predict 21st century summer Arctic sea ice loss by applying three distinct approaches to the problem…

Up in the Sky: Next week's forum on global climate & atmospheric modeling

New insight into the origin of monsoons, the potential use of aerosols to cool the globe, and how different industries uniquely impact atmospheric warming are the contributions of YCEI researchers at an upcoming forum on Global Climate and Atmospheric Modeling, Saturday, September 21, at KGL.  Researchers from Tokyo’s Todai University round out the 5-person forum with talks on the radiative forcing of aerosols in East Asia and a model of 100,000-year glacial-interglacial cycles.  The forum starts at 1 p.m.

A Town Hall Meeting at Yale with Senator Chris Murphy (September 13th, 2pm)

The Yale Climate and Energy Institute will host a panel discussion on how global warming will affect New England in the 21st century and how the region is preparing for the coming changes. The meeting will take place at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, in Burke Auditorium of Kroon Hall, on 195 Prospect Street in New Haven and include short talks by climate and infrastructure experts and a panel discussion with Senator Chris Murphy.

Join us for a discussion of these topics with panelists:

 – Senator Chris Murphy (D, CT)

Robust direct effect of carbon dioxide on tropical circulation and regional precipitation

Global warming simulations suggest that wet regions (where precipitation exceeds evaporation) will become wetter and dry regions drier by the end of the 21st century (e.g., Held and Soden 2006), with larger contrasts expected between dry and wet seasons (Chou et al., 2013). This ‘rich-get-richer’ behavior is consistent with a large increase in the moisture content of atmosphere, leading to enhanced horizontal moisture fluxes across regions.

When Crocodiles Roamed the Poles

(CNN) Most of us can appreciate that the world is an ancient place and that a lot has changed in the almost 4.6 billion years since it took its shape.

It’s not easy to have a feel for the amount of time that has passed, but grappling with deep time helps you understand why an atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration (CO2) of 400 parts per million (ppm) is meaningful.

Deep time is geologic time and the scale needed to fathom the evolution of life, mountains, oceans, and Earth’s climate.


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