Climate Science

studies and investigations pertaining to climate science in the most general sense

Climate and the Collapse of the Maya

The study of climate change, and realization that the Holocene, previously considered a period of great climatic stability experienced significant and dramatic disturbances, has occasioned new interdisciplinary study of the Maya, one of North and Central America’s great pre-Colombian civilizations. Scientists, anthropologists, archeologists, and historians have reinvigorated efforts to explain their sudden collapse, which took place from approximately 800-1000 CE in a period known as the Terminal Classic.

South America Weather Forecast: Gastrointestinal Disease Likely

Climate scientists predict that climate change will lead to increased variability in precipitation over much of South America.  Research by Carlton et al (2013) on residents of northwestern rural Ecuador who rely on streams and rivers for their drinking water shows how those changes might impact water quality and associated rates of diarrhea, a water-related disease which leads to approximately 1 million deaths of young children worldwide each year.  The study further highlighted curious dynamics involving precipitation and water-borne disease.

Culture and Arctic Climate Change: A Scoping Workshop to Explore Integrative Frameworks

This workshop was motivated by the appreciation that our knowledge of the human role in the Arctic system over millennia can be refined and greatly improved through better integration of high-latitude archaeology, ice core and other re-constructions of climate parameters, and studies of the contemporary Arctic environment. The two-day workshop brought together researchers working across a range of disciplines in order to explore the complex relationship between the dynamic Arctic environment and long-term human cultural responses.

"Polluters Talk. We Walk." NGO's Make Themselves Heard at COP 19

“Polluters talk, we walk” was the chant two weeks ago, as thousands of climate change activists walked out of the 19thUnited Nations Council of Parties (COP 19) conference a day before negotiations were scheduled to end. A spokesman for Oxfam blamed negotiators for insufficient outcomes to limit global temperature rise to 2 degrees Celsius as outlined by the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

First United Nations Resilience Academy Held in Bangladesh

Densely populated, and with 80% of its area located on a floodplain within 8 meters of sea-level1, Bangladesh is one of the world’s most flood-prone nations.  As such it’s an appropriate setting for a series of two United Nations University Resilience Academies that convene experts in research, policy and practical applications to help developing nations deal with the effects of climate change.


Subscribe to RSS - Climate Science