Climate Science

studies and investigations pertaining to climate science in the most general sense

Wind and Topographic Irregularities Influence Antarctic Melting

Loss of mass from ice sheets contributes to rising sea level. To understand the contributions of ice-sheets to sea level rise we must understand the spatial and temporal variability of ocean-driven melting, which has accelerated over recent decades.  Dutrieux and colleagues used observations and results from numerical modeling to show the case of Pine Island Glacier in the Amundsen Sea in west…

Intergenerational Differences in Carbon Emissions

Changing people’s carbon emission patterns requires first understanding the differences in behaviors and corresponding emissions levels between different groups of people. A recent paper by Chancel in the journal Ecological Economics investigated the differences in carbon emissions between different generations in the U.S. and France. The author examined carbon emissions by American and French

Climate Change Impacts Antarctica's Ross Sea

The Ross Sea, Antarctica’s most pristine region, is experiencing anomalously marked increase in sea ice concentration. Future changes in atmospheric temperatures and wind speeds, however, will likely produce a noticeably different environment. Smith et al. examines the effect of projected changes in atmospheric temperatures and winds on aspects of ocean circulation and its implications for primary…

Early Hominin Environments in the Turkana Basin, Kenya.

Thure Cerling is a pioneer in the use of stable isotopes of Carbon, Nitrogen and Oxygen to study historic changes in CO2 levels in the Earth’s atmosphere. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2001.  In recent years he’s used stable isotopes to analyze hair, teeth and bone to better understand the impacts of changing CO2 levels on habitat, animals and man.

Climate and the Collapse of the Maya

The study of climate change, and realization that the Holocene, previously considered a period of great climatic stability experienced significant and dramatic disturbances, has occasioned new interdisciplinary study of the Maya, one of North and Central America’s great pre-Colombian civilizations. Scientists, anthropologists, archeologists, and historians have reinvigorated efforts to explain their sudden collapse, which took place from approximately 800-1000 CE in a period known as the Terminal Classic.

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