Adaptation

Ending This Climate Madness

By Alisa Zomer

Even before the climate negotiations began this week, Typhoon Haiyan sent a message to the world – a message that is still making waves. The strength and trajectory of Typhoon Haiyan was unprecedented, even for the Philippines, an island nation that experiences more disasters than most. In response, the lead Filipino negotiator declared a fast for the duration of the climate negotiations until progress has been made to “stop this madness.”

A Town Hall Meeting at Yale with Senator Chris Murphy (September 13th, 2pm)

The Yale Climate and Energy Institute will host a panel discussion on how global warming will affect New England in the 21st century and how the region is preparing for the coming changes. The meeting will take place at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, in Burke Auditorium of Kroon Hall, on 195 Prospect Street in New Haven and include short talks by climate and infrastructure experts and a panel discussion with Senator Chris Murphy.

Join us for a discussion of these topics with panelists:

 – Senator Chris Murphy (D, CT)

What Happens in the Arctic Doesn't Stay in the Arctic (and why you should care).

Fran Ulmer is chair of the U.S. Arctic Research Commission, appointed by President Obama in March 2011. In June 2010, President Obama appointed her to the National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling. From 2007 to 2011, Ms. Ulmer was Chancellor of the University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA). Before that, she was a Distinguished Visiting Professor of Public Policy and Director of the Institute of Social and Economic Research at UAA. Ms.

New York City's Special Initiative for Rebuilding and Resilience: Strengths and Limitations of Climate Model-Based Approaches

Radley Horton from Columbia University Earth Institute will speak on climate projections for New York City.  The $20 billion Special Initiative for Rebuilding and Resiliency (SIRR) Plan for New York is grounded upon climate risk information provided by the New York City Panel on Climate Change (NPCC). This expert panel, tasked with advising the City on climate-related issues, completed a ‘rapid response’ climate assessment with updated climate projections.

YCEI Annual Conference 2013 — Water: The Looming Crises

Public discussions of climate change often focus on greenhouse gases and rising temperatures, but the most severe and immediate societal impacts of global warming are likely to be associated with changing hydrological conditions. Disruptions in water supply, extreme storms and record droughts may impact every aspect of rural and urban society: from agriculture and manufacturing to housing, energy and human health.

Challenges of Capturing Carbon

Capturing CO2 and storing it underground has been proposed as a potentially major player in mitigating global climate change by reducing CO2 emissions. Thermal power plants, being the largest point source of CO2 emissions, have thus become the primary target proposed for CO2 capture and storage (CCS). However, it is often overlooked that power plants are not only the largest CO2 emitter…

Research Initiatives

YCEI develops interdisciplinary Research Initiatives that integrate faculty, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students to address pressing issues in Climate and Energy.  Each Research Initiative is organized by a team of faculty and promotes solutions through the funding of collaborative research, as well as workshops and symposia that feature national and international experts.  Our Research Initiatives include:

High-Resolution Climate Assessments (for the NE U.S. and East Africa and Arabia)

Global climate models all predict that the Northeastern United States may be particularly vulnerable to both short- and long-term effects of global warming. Some of these effects—such as higher average temperature and sea level, along with more intense and more frequent storms and droughts—are already being felt in the New England area. As we learned from Hurricane Irene, Superstorm Sandy and winter storm Nemo, isolated weather extremes riding on gradual trends can be extraordinarily damaging. A 2011 report by the American Security Project estimated that failure to mitigate or plan for what is likely to become the new normal could result in the loss of 100,000 jobs and $22 billion from the regional economy between 2010 and 2050.  To help decision-makers prepare for this changing reality, the Yale Climate and Energy Institute will collaborate with researchers from the University of New Hampshire, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, and MIT to create a framework to rapidly generate stakeholder-driven high-resolution regional temperature and hydrological projections for future scenarios of CO2-induced global warming for the Northeast sector of the U.S. for the coming century.  

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