Adaptation

Buildings Can Save the Planet

Michelle Addington joins six other locally based and nationally prominent experts who are at the forefront of advanced building theory, science, planning, design, and construction.

This interactive conversation will explore the future for regenerative, climate-positive buildings that go beyond sustainability to actually sustaining and healing the environment.

The talk is part of New Haven’s annual International Festival of Arts and Ideas.  More details on the festival website: http://artidea.org/event/2014/1714.

Benefits Outweigh Costs of Massive Renewable Energy Deployment

The power grid is a massively complicated network of generators, power converters, and transmission lines controlled through the cooperation of numerous private corporations and local and international agencies. Grid operators rely on long and short-term “to-the-minute” weather predictions and other inputs to predict demand and prevent disruption. Government policies and economic constraints of the coming decades require the grid in the United States (and elsewhere) to become even more intelligent, interconnected, and efficient.

The Promise of Urban Science. Steven Koonin. Center for Urban Science and Progress, NYU

For the first time in history, more than half of the world’s population lives in urban areas; in just a few more decades, the world’s population will exceed 9 billion, 70 percent of whom will live in cities. Enabling those cities to deliver services effectively, efficiently, and sustainably while keeping their citizens safe, healthy, prosperous, and well-informed will be among the most important undertakings in this century. I will review how we are establishing a center for urban science and focus on bringing informatics to the study and operation of big systems.

Evolution in the Anthropocene: Population Genomics of NYC Wildlife

Over 50% of humans now lives in cities, and urbanization is one of the most important drivers of land transformation around the world.  Increasingly, human-drive changes such as urbanization or global climate change are also selective forces driving rapid evolutionary change in other species.  This presentation describes ongoing efforts to develop white-footed mice (and a few other species) in New York City as models for examining the evolutionary implications of urbanization.

First United Nations Resilience Academy Held in Bangladesh

By Elizabeth Tellman

Densely populated, and with 80% of its area located on a floodplain within 8 meters of sea-level1, Bangladesh is one of the world’s most flood-prone nations.  As such it’s an appropriate setting for a series of two United Nations University Resilience Academies that convene experts in research, policy and practical applications to help developing nations deal with the effects of climate change.

Ending This Climate Madness

By Alisa Zomer

Even before the climate negotiations began this week, Typhoon Haiyan sent a message to the world – a message that is still making waves. The strength and trajectory of Typhoon Haiyan was unprecedented, even for the Philippines, an island nation that experiences more disasters than most. In response, the lead Filipino negotiator declared a fast for the duration of the climate negotiations until progress has been made to “stop this madness.”

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