Adaptation

Lifestyles of the High and Low GHG Emitters

Where should you live to most reduce your carbon footprint? It seems obvious that city life with smaller homes, mass transportation, and easy access to shops and restaurants is preferable to the suburbs with its cars and bigger homes. But how about the benefits of rural areas where people grow their food and live closer to the land? What about regional climate, income and energy price differences? A recent analysis by Jones and Kammen (2013)…

Cold-adapted Species May Be Winners Under Climate Change

As the climate warms, all species will either need to find new habitats with similar temperatures to those they currently occupy or evolve new thermal tolerances. Recent research by Araujo and colleagues suggests that some species may be able to adapt to new, higher temperatures better than others. Specifically, the authors analyzed the heat and cold tolerance capabilities of 2740 terrestrial

Mining the written history of medieval Ireland for connections to human violence and climate change.

Francis Ludlow is a Postdoctoral Fellow with the Yale Climate & Energy Institute, where he works with Prof. Benedict Kiernan of the Department of History and Prof. Michael R. Dove of the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, on a project entitled Climate as Catalyst in 1,224 Years of Violence and Conflict in Ireland, 425-1649 CE. From 2013-2014 Francis held the position of Carson Fellow at …

New Perspectives on Past Climate Change and Societal Disruption

Urbino, Italy is the site of a 5-day conference devoted to climate change in the Holocene organized by the University of Urbino, Italy, California Institute of Technology and the Yale Climate and Energy Institute.  The meeting convenes over 20 leaders in paleoclimatology, archaeology, and history for an interdisciplinary discussion of new research on climate impacts on ancient societies.

Buildings Can Save the Planet

Michelle Addington joins six other locally based and nationally prominent experts who are at the forefront of advanced building theory, science, planning, design, and construction.

This interactive conversation will explore the future for regenerative, climate-positive buildings that go beyond sustainability to actually sustaining and healing the environment.

The talk is part of New Haven’s annual International Festival of Arts and Ideas.  More details on the festival website: http://artidea.org/event/2014/1714.

Benefits Outweigh Costs of Massive Renewable Energy Deployment

The power grid is a massively complicated network of generators, power converters, and transmission lines controlled through the cooperation of numerous private corporations and local and international agencies. Grid operators rely on long and short-term “to-the-minute” weather predictions and other inputs to predict demand and prevent disruption. Government policies and economic constraints of the coming decades require the grid in the United States (and elsewhere) to become even more intelligent, interconnected, and efficient.

The Promise of Urban Science. Steven Koonin. Center for Urban Science and Progress, NYU

For the first time in history, more than half of the world’s population lives in urban areas; in just a few more decades, the world’s population will exceed 9 billion, 70 percent of whom will live in cities. Enabling those cities to deliver services effectively, efficiently, and sustainably while keeping their citizens safe, healthy, prosperous, and well-informed will be among the most important undertakings in this century. I will review how we are establishing a center for urban science and focus on bringing informatics to the study and operation of big systems.

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